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News - 12th October 2016
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London Marathon 2017

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Congratulations to those of you who secured a place in the London Marathon 2017 ballot on Monday. We know how precious those spaces are to everyone who entered. If you managed to get a place and have not yet picked a charity you’d like to run for, where better to start than parkrun’s official charity partner, Alzheimer’s Research UK?

 

Last year parkrun founder Paul Sinton-Hewitt had a fantastic time running for us and raised over £17,000, thanks to the supportive parkrun community getting behind him! For more information on using your ballot place to run for the charity click here.

 

Of course if you were one of the unlucky ones this year, there’s still time to enter for one of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s golden bond London Marathon places. With a record-breaking year in 2016, raising £476,000 for the charity, we’d love to smash the half a million mark in 2017 so Alzheimer’s Research UK can continue funding the most vital and promising research into dementia.

 

We ask that our runners raise a minimum of £2,200. If you think you’re up to the challenge, go to the London Marathon page on our website.Applications will be reviewed on a monthly basis.

 

Good luck!

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